Beadhead Prince Nymph Night

So I took all of the suggestions you all threw my way (thank you very much) and headed over to French Creek Outfitters yesterday afternoon to pick up some supplies.  French Creek isn't a fly shop per se, but it's the best I've got locally without making a serious trek.

I decided that since I fish beadhead nymphs most often, I'd get some supplies to tie some of those first.  Among the things on my shopping list were some hooks (size 14 & 18 - I'm no Small Fly Funk, I don't think I can muster sub 20s yet), beads in both tungsten & brass, multiple colors of 6/0 thread, some copper & lead wire, peacock herl, and some goose biots.  Also grabbed some deer hair patches and hackle for future non-related ties.
Crappy Fly Tying Bench with Vise
Assorted Stuff

K.C. was over at the neighbors' house, so last night was "Beadhead Prince Nymph Night" for me, and I turned out about a dozen of these guys.  Even though I fish the snot outta these I had never tied one before.  Luckily thanks to a YouTube video, I got to cranking them out pretty quickly.  Valley Creek here we come!
My Version of A Bead Head Prince Nymph Fly
Finished Product

Hook:  Daiichi 1710 #14 Wet/Nymph Hook (it's what they had)
Thread:  Dark Brown 6/0 Uni-Thread
Head:  1/8 Brass bead
Body:  Peacock Herl
Ribbing:  Copper Ultra Wire
Weight:  Lead Wire
Wing:  White Goose Biots
Tail:  Brown Goose Biots

Comments

  1. Nice job, Michael! The Beadhead Prince Nymph is a deadly pattern for most trout waters. I completely understand why you would want to tie some of them up. Are you using a strike indicator when fishing them?

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  2. The fly looks good.You will quickly find that once you get used to tying one size a few times it will become easier to tie the smaller ones.

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  3. Very well done.
    And a very effective pattern.

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  4. Looks good! I need to tie some flies up myself, the box is getting low.

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  5. Thanks Mike. I put it into my Excel spreadsheet with the "ones I'll get to sometime during the winter". I have a few in my nymph box, but doesn't hurt to try one yourself. Besides, I'm heading for the fly shop in the morning to pick up a few things. Good time to get what I need for this.

    Mark

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  6. Good job, and choice of pattern, your well on your way in to another addiction. Yes, I'm not only a member I'm a addict too.

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  7. Well done Mike! Now you've done it. Opened a whole new can of worms, you just wait until you flip a rock over and have the stuff to make one or 12...

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  8. Looks good and one I have not tried to tie yet myself but will this winter.

    Thanks for sharing.

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  9. Nice job T. As good as a professional. I think you'd better some some to me so I can put my official stamp of approval on them.

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  10. Good looking bug... I'd throw it. I bet it produces too.

    The Average Joe Fisherman
    http://averagejoefisherman.blogspot.com/

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  11. @Mel - No strike indicator when I fish with the tenkara rod. Maybe a dry fly indicator, but that's it.

    @Morne - Thanks for the tip, everything in time, right?

    @Brk - I appreciate that out of you more than you might imagine.

    @Bill - Fill 'er up!

    @Shoreman - Let me know how it goes. You've definitely become a pro at tying up those buggers.

    @F&F - What's one more addiction, right?

    @Big - Looking forward to the day

    @PTO - Thanks, they're not that hard at all.

    @Cofisher - Would actually be happy (& honored) to.

    @Ryan - Thanks, the store bought ones are killer, hope the trout like mine too.

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